Conflict of Laws header image

Archive

Ralf Michaels

A half-day Conference at the Max Planck Institute in Hamburg, jointly convened by Ralf Michaels (Max Planck) and Verónica Ruiz Abou-Nigm (Edinburgh) will look at the (renewed) role of academia in Latin American Private International Law. Participants will come from several Latin American countries, as well as from the Institute.
More information and the program are here. The conference takes place on September 10, 13:00-17:30. Registrations by email at veranstaltungen@mpipriv.de

Thank you to everyone who responded to the call for paper. For those who were not yet ready, the deadline has been extended to May 17.

The Duke Journal of Comparative and International Law has published two new articles on the Hague Judgments project, just in time for the upcoming Diplomatic Session in June. David Goddard QC, Chair of the Special Commission on the Judgments Project, describes the current state of play in the development of a draft Convention and identifies some of the key issues that participants will need to address when they meet in June. Louise Ellen Teitz (Roger Williams University and formerly First Secretary at the Hague Conference) provides the background on the negotiations through the years and suggests bucking the past to provide for the future. Both articles, emerging from symposia at NYU and at the AALS annual meeting respectively, will be essential reading for participants and observers of the Diplomatic Session.

Outline and Call for Papers

 

Deadline extended: May 17!

Two Conferences in Brazil

Two conferences on private international law have been announced for Brazil. From March 13-16, the University of Brasilia will organize a conference on the topic of “Challenges to Private International Law in contemporary society” (Program here.) Prior to that, I will teach a graduate mini-course on comparative law and private international law on March 11-13. Sign-up information for both is on the linked sites.

Annual Report 2018 of the Hague Conference

The Hague Conference has posted its annual report 2018, in traditional pdf and even more traditional paper format. Much space is taken up by reminiscences of the 125th anniversary , including the publication of several speeches. Beyond that are reports of other events, as well as general information, some more useful (new ratifications and accessions in 2018), some perhaps less so (the number of followers on twitter).

On February 26, Budapest will see the kick off conference for an EU-sponsored cooperation of seven universities on the operation of EU private international law in Central Europe. The conference program and the registration link are available here.

Annual Survey of American Choice-of-Law Cases for 2018

Symeon Symeonides‘ Annual Survey of American Choice-of-Law Cases for 2018, now in its 32nd year, has been posted on SSRN. A summary of the contents is reproduced below. If you are interested in the Survey, you can download it by clicking here.
If you are interested in the Private International Law Bibliography for 2018, you can download it from SSRN by clicking here.

The American Association of Law Schools will hold its annual conference in New Orleans this year, from January 2-6. In this conference, the meeting of the Conflict of Laws Interest Group will be on Friday January 4, 8:30-10:15. (Yes, early.) The topic is the new Hague Judgments Convention (the draft Convention is here.) Speakers will include Louise Ellen Teitz (Rhode Island University) with a view from the Hague, Trey Childress (Pepperdine/State Dept) with a view from the State Department, and John Coyle (UNC) with a view from academia. I will chair. The remarks will be published later in the Duke Journal of Comparative and International Law, but if you are at the AALS Conference, please do come and discuss there!

For the second time, the Society of Legal Scholars (SLS) conference, held this September at Queen Mary University of London, ran a conflict of laws section (more papers on conflict of laws given in other sections here, look for “conflict of laws”). Michael Douglas provides a charming report. Hopefully this is a sign of increased appreciation of conflict of laws as a scholarly discipline.